GREENPEACE — FRANCE — BIODIVERSITY AND ECOSYSTEM — MACRO WORLD — PLANET EARTH OUR HOME group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH OUR HOME is our flagship group with over 12,000 members and over 867,000 photos and videos.

Greenpeace

Biodiversity loss: urgent need for forest, ocean protection and dietary change:

Paris, France – The UN’s biodiversity report warning of mass species loss due to human impacts must spark urgent action to protect the world’s forests and oceans and lead to sweeping change in agriculture and food production and consumption.

The global assessment report on biodiversity and ecosystem services from the Intergovernmental Panel on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) warned that 1 million species are at risk of extinction, more than at any time in human history.

Open Up

Blue and green in the soft wind

Flower Picking

Sage

Painting

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Greenpeace * United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

GREENPEACE — GREENPEACE NEW ZEALAND — BAN SYNTHETIC NITROGEN FERTILIZER — PLANET EARTH OUR HOME group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH OUR HOME is our flagship group with over 12,000 members and over 866,000 photos and videos.

 

BAN SYNTHETIC NITROGEN FERTILIZER

The problem:

Synthetic nitrogen fertiliser is added to grass to make it grow faster. More grass means more cows – that means more climate and river pollution.

The solution:

But there is another way. Regenerative agriculture works with nature, not against it. If we banned chemical nitrogen fertiliser, we would set ourselves on the way to a better way to farm. A win for our climate and our rivers!

Top Contributors

John Horstman (itchydogimages, SINOBUG)alpenglowtravelersDiegojack–MARCO POLO–tucker.tterence
Mexican fire barrel blooms in the Cactus & Succulent Garden at Tucson Botanical Gardens

十石舟乘船場

Frühling

Großer Blaupfeil (orthetrum cancellatum)

Two blossoms

SIERRA CLUB — PACIFIC COAST’S WILD EDGE — PLANET EARTH MACRO WORLD group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH MACRO WORLD has over 1,600 members and over 97,000 photos and videos. 

Gray whales have one of the longest migrations of any mammal, traveling each year from calving lagoons along Mexico’s Baja Peninsula up to feeding grounds in Alaska’s Beaufort Sea. Similarly impressive migrations along the Pacific Coast are made by other whale species, as well as elephant seals, sea lions, sharks, tuna, and the millions of birds that traverse the Pacific Flyway.

The promise of large open spaces drew the emerging photographer to North America, where he discovered that even large areas of protected wilderness like Yellowstone National Park aren’t safe from fragmentation. For example, the artificial boundaries of large parks don’t necessarily take the migrations and dispersal of wildlife into account. Schulz argues that parks can become prisons rather than preserves, especially as climate change causes ecological boundaries to shift. Schulz is a proponent of wildlife corridors, which he believes can correct the fragmentation caused by human-designated wilderness areas by acting as land or water bridges that allow wildlife to move between parks and ecosystems.

Top Contributors

John Horstman (itchydogimages, SINOBUG)deta kIn Memoriam: Ecuador Megadiversoorb1806Hugo von Schrk

1830

Coccinelle à sept points (Coccinella septempunctata)

P7121630

Arc en ciel

Still here

SIERRA CLUB — PACIFIC COAST’S WILD EDGE — PLANET EARTH MACRO WORLD group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH MACRO WORLD has over 1,600 members and over 97,000 photos and videos. 

Gray whales have one of the longest migrations of any mammal, traveling each year from calving lagoons along Mexico’s Baja Peninsula up to feeding grounds in Alaska’s Beaufort Sea. Similarly impressive migrations along the Pacific Coast are made by other whale species, as well as elephant seals, sea lions, sharks, tuna, and the millions of birds that traverse the Pacific Flyway.

The promise of large open spaces drew the emerging photographer to North America, where he discovered that even large areas of protected wilderness like Yellowstone National Park aren’t safe from fragmentation. For example, the artificial boundaries of large parks don’t necessarily take the migrations and dispersal of wildlife into account. Schulz argues that parks can become prisons rather than preserves, especially as climate change causes ecological boundaries to shift. Schulz is a proponent of wildlife corridors, which he believes can correct the fragmentation caused by human-designated wilderness areas by acting as land or water bridges that allow wildlife to move between parks and ecosystems.

Top Contributors

John Horstman (itchydogimages, SINOBUG)deta kIn Memoriam: Ecuador Megadiversoorb1806Hugo von Schrk

1830

Coccinelle à sept points (Coccinella septempunctata)

P7121630

Arc en ciel

Still here

GREENPEACE — Animal Collective’s “Tangerine Reef”: Myth, Mystery and Subtle Environmentalism — PLANET EARTH MACRO WORLD group

PLANET EARTH MACRO WORLD has over 1,600 members and over 96,000 photos and videos. 

GREENPEACE

That environment of the unknown — and protecting it — was the inspiration behind the band Animal Collective’s latest album and video, Tangerine Reef. Created to coincide with the International Year of the Reef, the musicians tell how art can help inspire us to reckon with climate change before its too late.

A must see video, ck. it out.

The video for Tangerine Reef shows corals moving 10 times their natural speed, making them seem otherworldly but humanlike. Slimy appendages wriggle and feed neon, tessellating mouths. At times, they seem to smile. At other times, the images drift into patterns and abstraction.

There is still a lot we don’t know about corals: Scientists weren’t sure how they reproduced until 1981 and researchers are still learning the details about how they live, grow and respond to environmental stresses.

Top Contributors

John Horstman (itchydogimages, SINOBUG)deta kEcuador Megadiversoorb1806Hugo von Schreck
raindrops in the garden

Surprenante nature.

Libelle 79

DSC04980

Dichrooscytus rufipennis