CRITICALLY ENDANGERED — BIRDS — BAHAMA NUTHATCH — PLANET EARTH IN BLACK AND WHITE group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH IN BLACK AND WHITE has over 3,000 members and over 173,000 photos and videos.

 

BAHAMA NUTHATCH

Estimated population:  Two to five individuals

ICUN Status: Critically Endangered

Location: Grand Bahama Island, The Bahamas

After declining for decades, the total population of the Bahama Nuthatch was estimated to be 1,800 in 2004. In just three years, subsequent hurricanes destroyed remaining habitat, reducing the number to 23. When Hurricane Matthew struck the island of Grand Bahama in 2016, the nuthatch disappeared, and some feared it was extinct. In 2018, researchers rediscovered the bird. Surveys this year, however, failed to find any birds. ABC is working with a local partner to support ongoing search efforts. The Bahama Nuthatch faces various suspected threats, including habitat destruction and degradation, invasive predatory species, fire, and hurricane damage.

Bahama Nuthatch by Tom Benson.

 The Bahama Nuthatch is closely related to the Brown-headed Nuthatch of the southeastern United States, but can be distinguished by its longer beak, shorter wings, whiter belly, and vocalizations. The bird is only known from native pine forest on Grand Bahama Island, which lies approximately 100 miles off Palm Beach, Fla.

Top Contributors

alexinatempaJohn KocijanskiSARK S-Wl4tsValt3r Rav3ra – DEVOted!
Eurasian blackbird, Turdus merula, Koltrast

industriālo baložu samits / industrial pigeon summit

I gabbiani di Sirmione

Magical Reflections: Monochrome Heron

Fly High

CRITICALLY ENDANGERED — BIRDS — BAHAMA NUTHATCH — PLANET EARTH IN BLACK AND WHITE group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH IN BLACK AND WHITE has over 3,000 members and over 173,000 photos and videos.

 

BAHAMA NUTHATCH

Estimated population:  Two to five individuals

ICUN Status: Critically Endangered

Location: Grand Bahama Island, The Bahamas

After declining for decades, the total population of the Bahama Nuthatch was estimated to be 1,800 in 2004. In just three years, subsequent hurricanes destroyed remaining habitat, reducing the number to 23. When Hurricane Matthew struck the island of Grand Bahama in 2016, the nuthatch disappeared, and some feared it was extinct. In 2018, researchers rediscovered the bird. Surveys this year, however, failed to find any birds. ABC is working with a local partner to support ongoing search efforts. The Bahama Nuthatch faces various suspected threats, including habitat destruction and degradation, invasive predatory species, fire, and hurricane damage.

Bahama Nuthatch by Tom Benson.

 The Bahama Nuthatch is closely related to the Brown-headed Nuthatch of the southeastern United States, but can be distinguished by its longer beak, shorter wings, whiter belly, and vocalizations. The bird is only known from native pine forest on Grand Bahama Island, which lies approximately 100 miles off Palm Beach, Fla.

Top Contributors

alexinatempaJohn KocijanskiSARK S-Wl4tsValt3r Rav3ra – DEVOted!
Eurasian blackbird, Turdus merula, Koltrast

industriālo baložu samits / industrial pigeon summit

I gabbiani di Sirmione

Magical Reflections: Monochrome Heron

Fly High

SIERRA CLUB — WARMING LAKES WORLDWIDE COULD MEAN MORE TOXIC ALGAL BLOOMS — PLANET EARTH IN BLACK AND WHITE group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH IN BLACK AND WHITE has over 3,800 members and over 172,000 photos and videos.

A new study of algal bloom activity in dozens of freshwater lakes around the world provides an answer: For the past 30 years, lakes nearly everywhere have been experiencing more frequent and severe toxic algal blooms—and a changing climate is one reason why.

Researchers at the Carnegie Institution for Science used satellite data collected over the past three decades to examine large freshwater lakes across six continents. They searched through more than 72 billion data points to identify statistically significant patterns in algal bloom intensity and found that the severity of algal blooms has increased in over two-thirds of the 71 large lakes studied across 33 countries.

Top Contributors

alexinatempaJohn KocijanskiSARK S-Wl4tsValt3r Rav3ra – DEVOted!
Osaka

DRD160702_0824

1_DSC8584

3_DSC7860

Männer

BLACK AND WHITE PHOTOGRAPHY — PLANET EARTH SUNRISE SUNSETS group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH SUNRISE SUNSETS has over 5,000 members and over 114,000 photos and videos.

Top Contributors

54StorminWillyGJ54tucker.tterenceJohn SteedmanDiegojackturbguy – pro
Late Summer Morning

Winter

Princes Quay Carpark

Sun pillar

Take a Walk on the Light Side - Street & Urban Spirit

CRITICALLY ENDANGERED — BIRDS — BAHAMA NUTHATCH — PLANET EARTH IN BLACK AND WHITE group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH IN BLACK AND WHITE has over 3,000 members and over 169,000 photos and videos.

 

BAHAMA NUTHATCH

Estimated population:  Two to five individuals

ICUN Status: Critically Endangered

Location: Grand Bahama Island, The Bahamas

After declining for decades, the total population of the Bahama Nuthatch was estimated to be 1,800 in 2004. In just three years, subsequent hurricanes destroyed remaining habitat, reducing the number to 23. When Hurricane Matthew struck the island of Grand Bahama in 2016, the nuthatch disappeared, and some feared it was extinct. In 2018, researchers rediscovered the bird. Surveys this year, however, failed to find any birds. ABC is working with a local partner to support ongoing search efforts. The Bahama Nuthatch faces various suspected threats, including habitat destruction and degradation, invasive predatory species, fire, and hurricane damage.

Bahama Nuthatch by Tom Benson.

 The Bahama Nuthatch is closely related to the Brown-headed Nuthatch of the southeastern United States, but can be distinguished by its longer beak, shorter wings, whiter belly, and vocalizations. The bird is only known from native pine forest on Grand Bahama Island, which lies approximately 100 miles off Palm Beach, Fla.

Top Contributors

alexinatempaJohn KocijanskiSARK S-Wl4tsValt3r Rav3ra – DEVOted!
Eurasian blackbird, Turdus merula, Koltrast

industriālo baložu samits / industrial pigeon summit

I gabbiani di Sirmione

Magical Reflections: Monochrome Heron

Fly High