GREENPEACE NEW ZEALAND — BAN SYNTHETIC NITROGEN FERTILIZER — PLANET EARTH IN SILHOUETTES group

PLANET EARTH IN SILHOUETTES has over 1,500 members and over 24,000 photos and videos. 

BAN SYNTHETIC NITROGEN FERTILIZER

The problem:

Synthetic nitrogen fertiliser is added to grass to make it grow faster. More grass means more cows – that means more climate and river pollution.

The solution:

But there is another way. Regenerative agriculture works with nature, not against it. If we banned chemical nitrogen fertiliser, we would set ourselves on the way to a better way to farm. A win for our climate and our rivers!

Groundhog Day Sunset

Robin Dawn Chorus

Tout l'or du monde

The Cook, the Thief, His Wife and Her Lover

bellagio fountains 03571

BIRD OF THE WEEK — ASHY STORM-PETREL — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,600 members and over 130,000 photos and videos.

BIRD OF THE WEEK

ASHY STORM-PETREL

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Hydrobates (Oceanodroma) homochroa
POPULATION: 3,500-6,700 adults
IUCN STATUS: Endangered
TREND: Decreasing
HABITAT: Nests in rocky crevices and cavities on islands, islets, mainland cliffs, and in sea caves. Spends the rest of its time at sea.

The Ashy Storm-Petrel is a small, sooty-colored seabird, slightly larger than an Eastern Bluebird. An adult can fit nicely into the palm of one’s hand and weighs just a bit more than one ounce. This specialized seabird can only be found in the area of the Pacific Ocean’s California Current, where the cold waters are rich in nutrients that sustain sea creatures from tiny krill to enormous whales. 

The species is a member of an order of seabirds (Procellariiformes) nicknamed “tubenoses” after the pair of horny tubes on their upper mandibles. These tubes have an important function: They channel and excrete excess salt, which is filtered out by specialized glands. These adaptations make it possible for the birds to ingest seawater — essential for a species at sea most of its life.

Top Contributors

DansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos
Bearded Reedling

Superb fairywren

After the rain...a ray of sunshine.

Gisela_Nagel-Fl-9246-Bartmeise

Eurasian blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus)

AUDUBON’S ORIOLE — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,600 members and over 130,000 photos and videos.

ABC

AUDUBON’S ORIOLE

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Icterus graduacauda 
POPULATION: Fewer than 5,000 in U.S., but most of range is in Mexico.
TREND: Decreasing 
HABITAT: Riparian and live-oak woods.

Formerly known as the Black-headed Oriole, the flashy but furtive Audubon’s Oriole is one of North America’s two yellow-and-black orioles. (The other is Scott’s Oriole, also found in the U.S. Southwest and Mexico.) Audubon’s Oriole, like the Green Jay, is a species sought after by birders visiting Texas’ Lower Rio Grande Valley.

Although as brightly colored as a Green Jay or Painted Bunting, this large oriole can be a challenge to spot. Bright yellow is often difficult to distinguish amid green foliage, and unlike the more familiar Baltimore Oriole, Audubon’s Oriole tends to remain deep under cover, where it is more often heard than seen.

Top ContributorsDansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos
Pimpelmees

Lamprotornis superbus

GOLDFINCH

Jacamar

Great Spotted Woodpecker

Eurasian hoopoe (Upupa epops)

NEWS AND PERSPECTIVES ON BIRD CONSERVATION — BIOlOGICAL STATION, BRAZIL — DAISIES — PLANET EARTH OUR HOME group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH OUR HOME is our flagship group with over 12,000 members and over 870,000 photos and videos.

BIRD CALLS

News and Perspectives on Bird Conservation

The Canudos Biological Station, located in Brazil’s Bahia Department, is a pioneering initiative managed by Biodiversitas Foundation that protects one of the planet’s most endangered and admired birds, the Lear’s Macaw (EN). Thanks to focused conservation efforts, the species’ numbers have increased from a few dozen in the late 1980s to approximately 1,700 today. The 3,274-acre reserve is striking: Its sandstone canyons are weathered into odd forms, cloaked in Caatinga habitat with giant cacti and unique flora, including the Licuri Palm, an important food for the macaw.

Canudos Biological Station is one of our top birding destinations. Photo by Ciro Ginez Albano

To see the Lear’s Macaw, go during the breeding season (March to May) and be prepared to rise before dawn. Guides at the reserve, employed from the local community, will lead you to see flocks of these large, noisy, dazzling blue birds as they flap past the dramatic red sandstone canyons where they roost and nest.

Learn more about visiting Canudos.

Top Contributors

John Horstman (itchydogimages, SINOBUG)alpenglowtravelersDiegojack–MARCO POLO–tucker.tterence
Flowers

Sunset daisies...

Visiting Daisy :-)

Sunset daisies...

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