ANTIOQUIA BRUSHFINCH PROBABLY EXTINCT– BIRDS — PLANET EARTH OUR HOME group

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Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH OUR HOME is our flagship with over 12,000 members and over 837,000 photos and videos.

Species Unseen For 47 Years Rediscovered Near Colombian Town Named For Miracles. Fewer than 20 Antioquia Brushfinches are known, and habitat is under immediate threat.

The Antioquia Brushfinch was first described by ornithologist Thomas Donegan in 2007, after a review of brushfinch specimens in South American and European collections. Donegan noticed three specimens labeled from San Pedro de los Milagros and “Antioquia” generally that were marked as representing the widespread Slaty Brushfinch, but looked different. Two of these specimens were undated, and one was collected in 1971. Many feared that the species “discovered” in the museum drawers was extinct, after several searches over the last 12 years failed to find it.

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Green Heron Impossible Balancing Act While Fishing.

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Kentucky Warbler

Crane in (f)light

 

 

UNTIED NATIONS HIGH COMMISSIONER FOR REFUGEES (UNHCR) — PLANET EARTH IN SILHOUETTES group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH IN SILHOUETTES has over 1,400 members and over 24,000 photos and videos. 

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Displaced and stateless women and girls at heightened risk of gender-based violence in the coronavirus pandemic:

Confinement policies, lockdowns and quarantines adopted across the world as a response to the pandemic have led to restricted movement, reduced community interaction, the closure of services and worsening socio-economic conditions. These factors are significantly exacerbating the risks of intimate partner violence.

For survivors of violence and those at-risk, the consequences of COVID-19 also mean limited access to life-saving support, such as psycho-social, health and security services. Imposed mobility restrictions and containment measures make it difficult for women to access help while some services, including safe shelters, have been temporarily suspended, re-purposed or closed.

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Barber wanted (Frisör gesucht)

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Sunset with clouds and birds

Sunset on Hatchet Pond

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BIRD OF THE WEEK — KING EIDER — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,600 members and over 119,000 photos and videos.

BIRD OF THE WEEK

King Eider

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Somateria spectabilis
POPULATION: 4.5 million
TREND: Decreasing
HABITAT: Nests near freshwater lakes and ponds; winters along rocky coasts and on open ocean.

The King Eider’s species name spectabilis is Latin for “remarkable display,” referring to the drake, or adult male, in its breeding plumage. During that time, the drake is unmistakable, with powder-blue head and neck, light green cheek, orange-yellow frontal lobe outlined in black, and a red bill.

King Eider pair. Rob Kempers/Shutterstock.

The female eider sits tightly on her eggs and sometimes can be approached very closely. Females are so faithful to their nests that they sometimes go a week or more without feeding, and thus may lose significant amounts of weight while incubating.

 

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Chloris chloris - European greenfinch

Dunnock

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Bombycilla garrulus

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SIERRA CLUB — BUMBLEBEES NEED A DIVERSE DIET TOO — SEPIA PHOTOGRAPHY — PLANET EARTH LANDSCAPES group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

 

PLANET EARTH LANDSCAPES has over 7,000 members and over 316,000 photos and videos.

Queen honeybees have a pretty cushy life. Living inside the hive, worker bees take care of most tasks like collecting pollen and nectar, producing honey, and fixing up the hive. But that’s not the case for queen bumblebees. For most of their life, the fuzzy, fat, black-and-yellow bees in the genus Bombus fly solo and have to fatten up after hibernation, found a colony, and raise a batch of baby workers before they get a day off. Those weeks as a single mother are perilous for bumblebees, which rely on early-blooming flowers to survive the spring. A new study shows that the more diverse the flowers the queen bees can access, the better off the bees are in the long run.

Unlike queen honeybees, Apis mellifera, which can live for years and overwinter in their hives, the bumblebee life cycle is annual. In the fall, after mating with a male drone, new queen bumblebees dig a cavity in the ground to overwinter. When they emerge in the spring, it’s their job to find a new nest site, which can be a cavity in a tree, a hole in the ground, or even a nice tussock of grass. But searching for real estate is hard work, and the bees need to eat flower pollen for protein and sip nectar for sugar as they go about their business.

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Backlit landscape in sepia!

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GREENPEACE — SCIENTISTS SOUND ALARM ABOUT “DESTRUCTIVE” DEEP SEA MINING — PLANET EARTH UNDERWATER group

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Greenpeace * United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH UNDERWATER has over 1,000 members and over 41,000 photos and videos.

GREENPEACE

Kingston, Jamaica – Marine scientists from around the world have issued a stark warning about the emerging industry of deep sea mining, stating that its development “puts the overall health of ocean ecosystems under threat” and could contribute to climate breakdown. [1] Greenpeace activists went to the International Seabed Authority (ISA) annual meeting in Kingston, joined by the members of Jamaica Environment Trust and representatives of several other Jamaican civil society organizations, to deliver a  letter of concern by 28 scientists from eight countries to the participants of the meeting. A banner was unfurled at the event which said “No deep sea mining” as Greenpeace demands protection of the sea bed and global oceans.

Esperanza in Jamaica with Banner © Bárbara Sánchez Palomero / Greenpeace

Activists from around the world have sailed on board the Greenpeace ship Esperanza, to join in a peaceful assembly in front of one of the battlegrounds for protecting the deep oceans from monster mining machines: the International Seabed Authority (ISA), which is hosting its 25th Assembly in Kingston, Jamaica.

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Heniochus chrysostomus

Amphiprion ocellaris

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Berthella martensi

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